A secluded setting with lounges and boudoirs
in the heart of Strasbourg 

A bourgeois mansion, the 1741 was structured into small apartments which, following expert renovation works, were transformed into superb and atypical Baroque lounge-boudoirs occupying three floors.

An elegant, secluded setting in which to enjoy the gastronomic cuisine served up by the restaurant's team. 

The Robert de Cotte Lounge

The Robert de Cotte Lounge on the ground floor can accommodate up to eight people, in a quiet, understated and cosy atmosphere. Decorated in materials with powdered tones, its charm is enhanced by an antique oak bookcase and a collection of works all printed in 1741. 

This lounge can be reserved for private functions for 7 to 9 guests.

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Joseph Massol Lounge

The Joseph Massol lounge on the 1st floor: a sparkling room with bright acidic and anise green colours that bring a refreshing contrast to the Louis XVI armchairs. 12 guests can dine here, in a setting reminiscent of the Salle du Synode (Synod Hall) – one of the dining rooms in the Palais Rohan, a photo of which is displayed on one of the walls. 

This lounge can be reserved for private functions for 10 to 14 guests.

Cagliostro Lounge

The Cagliostro Boudoir on the 1st floor: a small alcove for 5 people that offers a superb example of 18th century art with an anise and pink 'Toile de Jouy'.

Count Alessandro di Cagliostro, an Italian adventurer, stayed in the Maison de La Lanterne, opposite the 1741.

Gaston de Rohan Lounge

The Gaston de Rohan Lounge on the 3rd floor: a secluded haven of tranquillity with a theatrical décor, enhanced by mouldings and the lights of the majestic Baccarat chandelier, offering a privileged and discreet setting for up to 8 diners.

This lounge can be reserved for private functions for 6 to 8 guests.

GASTON ARMAND DE ROHAN (3rd floor): (1674-1749), Canon of the Cathedral of Strasbourg, bishop in 1704, then cardinal in 1706, member of the 'Académie Française', he had the Episcopal Palace of Strasbourg built between 1732 and 1741.